she is the daughter of one of the many Zechariah’s in the Bible, and the mother of king Hezekiah and wife of king Ahaz of Judah (2 Kings 18:2). In the parallel text of 2 Chronicles 29:1, she is called Abijah.

Etymology of the name Abi

 

The name Abi consists of a word that is among the most frequently occurring in names: אב (ab), meaning father:

Abarim Publications’ online Biblical Hebrew Dictionary

 
אב

In Hebrew the word אב (‘ab) is the proper word for father, but it comes from an assumed root אבה (‘bh). What that root (verb) may have meant to the Hebrews, we don’t know because it’s not used in the Bible, and that means we have no context to try it to. BDB Theological Dictionary is even less yielding and declares this root “perhaps at least formally justified as the stem of אב (‘ab), but existence and meaning wholly dubious”. But, sayeth BDB in the shortest abbreviations justifiable, there is an Assyrian verbabu, which means to decide. The ‘ab would thus be the one who decides.

And then, to make matters worse, there’s the verb אבה (‘aba), which is spelled and pronounced identical to the assumed root of אב (‘ab). This verb is quite common in the Bible, and it means to accede to a wish, consent or accept to a reproach. HAW Theological Wordbook notes, “The primary meaning of this root is the willingness (inclination) to do something under obligation or upon request”.

And of course there’s the word אב (‘eb), which means freshness or fresh green, from the assumed rootאבב (‘bb). Another derivation of this root is the word אביב (‘abib), meaning barley. Hence the name Tel Aviv.

But the word אב (‘ab), meaning father, also occurs in meanings other than that of a biological parent. Sometimes it’s used to indicate the lord of a village (Isaiah 22:21), or an elder (2 Kings 2:12), or an ancestor (Genesis 10:21), and often it simply indicates a position of authority; a counselor (Genesis 45:8) or prophet (2 Kings 6:21). The word ‘ab is also ascribed to God (Isaiah 63:16, Hosea 11:1)

It stands to reason that the word אב (‘ab) is not, like our word “father” reserved for the male parent and used metaphorically for other people, but rather a word of unknown and unparalleled meaning, which expresses respect to persons of authority, including male parents.

The word ‘ab followed by the letter yod usually makes the ab-part possessive. The construct אבי (‘abi) may mean “father of,” “my father,” or form the adjective fatherly (literally “of father”).

Also note the following structure, and remember that a man’s “house” is not simply a building but rather his wife and children:

  • The noun אב (‘ab) means father and possibly comes from the root אבה (‘bh). A verb spelled and pronounced exactly the same as the assumed root of the word אב (‘ab) is the verb אבה (‘aba), meaning to do something under obligation or upon request.
  • The noun בן (ben) means son and probably comes from the verb בנה (bana) meaning to build, such as a house. From בן (ben) in turn comes the word בת (bat), which means daughter. Linguistically unrelated but still striking is the word בית (bayit, or beth in constructs such as Bethel or Bethlehem), which means house. And equally unrelated but still striking is the verb בין (bin), literally meaning being able to see a difference; perceive or discern. A derivative of this verb is the substantive בין(ben), meaning between.

Read more Comments Off on The name Abi in the Bible The name Abi occurs only once in the Bible;

:

  • One Abiel the Arbathite is mentioned among David’s mighty-men in 1 Chronicles 11:32. But in 2 Samuel 23:31 he’s called Abi-albon.
  • The other Abiel is the father of Kish and grandfather of king Saul, and the father of Ner, Saul’s uncle and grandfather of Abner, the son of Ner, according to 1 Samuel 9:1 and 14:50-51. But in 1 Chronicles 8:33 and 9:39, not Abiel but Ner is listed as the father of Kish, and Abiel is not mentioned. It happens a few times in the Bible that people are known by two completely different names, so Saul’s grandfather may have been called Abiel by some and Ner by others. Still, Gesenius, Alfred Jones and BDB Theological Dictionary declare Abiel the grandfather and Ner the uncle of Saul.

Etymology of the name Abiel

 

The name Abiel consists of two very common name-elements. The first element is the noun אב (ab), meaning father:

Abarim Publications’ online Biblical Hebrew Dictionary

 
אב

In Hebrew the word אב (‘ab) is the proper word for father, but it comes from an assumed root אבה (‘bh). What that root (verb) may have meant to the Hebrews, we don’t know because it’s not used in the Bible, and that means we have no context to try it to. BDB Theological Dictionary is even less yielding and declares this root “perhaps at least formally justified as the stem of אב (‘ab), but existence and meaning wholly dubious”. But, sayeth BDB in the shortest abbreviations justifiable, there is an Assyrian verbabu, which means to decide. The ‘ab would thus be the one who decides.

And then, to make matters worse, there’s the verb אבה (‘aba), which is spelled and pronounced identical to the assumed root of אב (‘ab). This verb is quite common in the Bible, and it means to accede to a wish, consent or accept to a reproach. HAW Theological Wordbook notes, “The primary meaning of this root is the willingness (inclination) to do something under obligation or upon request”.

And of course there’s the word אב (‘eb), which means freshness or fresh green, from the assumed rootאבב (‘bb). Another derivation of this root is the word אביב (‘abib), meaning barley. Hence the name Tel Aviv.

But the word אב (‘ab), meaning father, also occurs in meanings other than that of a biological parent. Sometimes it’s used to indicate the lord of a village (Isaiah 22:21), or an elder (2 Kings 2:12), or an ancestor (Genesis 10:21), and often it simply indicates a position of authority; a counselor (Genesis 45:8) or prophet (2 Kings 6:21). The word ‘ab is also ascribed to God (Isaiah 63:16, Hosea 11:1)

It stands to reason that the word אב (‘ab) is not, like our word “father” reserved for the male parent and used metaphorically for other people, but rather a word of unknown and unparalleled meaning, which expresses respect to persons of authority, including male parents.

The word ‘ab followed by the letter yod usually makes the ab-part possessive. The construct אבי (‘abi) may mean “father of,” “my father,” or form the adjective fatherly (literally “of father”).

Also note the following structure, and remember that a man’s “house” is not simply a building but rather his wife and children:

  • The noun אב (‘ab) means father and possibly comes from the root אבה (‘bh). A verb spelled and pronounced exactly the same as the assumed root of the word אב (‘ab) is the verb אבה (‘aba), meaning to do something under obligation or upon request.
  • The noun בן (ben) means son and probably comes from the verb בנה (bana) meaning to build, such as a house. From בן (ben) in turn comes the word בת (bat), which means daughter. Linguistically unrelated but still striking is the word בית (bayit, or beth in constructs such as Bethel or Bethlehem), which means house. And equally unrelated but still striking is the verb בין (bin), literally meaning being able to see a difference; perceive or discern. A derivative of this verb is the substantive בין(ben), meaning between.

Read more Comments Off on The name Abiel in the Bible There are two Abiels in the Bible, and both are a bit mysterious

The name satan in the Bible

 

The qualities and character of the creature known as satan are almost all debatable. He is thought to be acherub or ex-cherub but there’s very little proof of that, and he’s been expelled from heaven (Job 1:6, Revelation 12:9). We know that he led an insurrection, but it is highly unlikely that his following is organized in the way that God’s following is organized. Suffice to say that he poses no threat to God and is certainly not an equal counter-pole.

Christ’s victory over satan at His resurrection is a victory obtained for mankind. There is no indication that God and satan ever came to blows personally. Satan is not omnipresent and not omnipotent or omniscient. He has no ability to create, and indications are myriad that he is not even able to govern or manage any large number of creatures (see our all-telling article on the name Beelzebub).

Nothing that is commonly ascribed to satan (darkness, fire, evil) actually belongs to satan, as everything belongs to God; the entire world (Psalm 24:1), and all souls (Ezekiel 18:4). And believe it or not: even the name Lucifer does not belong to satan.

The functional essence of satan may even have originated in a true purpose; the trying and hence actualizing of the potential of God’s creation. In the Book of Job (which in itself is monstrously complicated and difficult to place, especially chronologically) satan is still allowed an audience with God and God renders him a specifically limited authority to try Job. Satan goes at it and doesn’t cross the line, and perhaps this is why satan is not rebuked in the Book of Job. In stead, in the conclusion of Job’s story it reads, “…they consoled him and comforted him for all the evil that the Lord had brought on him”.

The events surrounding the Fall Of Man (Genesis 3) may be understood as satan violating a specific limitation set by God: see what they’ll come up with but don’t make them feed off the Tree Of Knowledge Of Good And Evil. What exactly went wrong we don’t know, but satan became proud and may have even tried a coup against God. The arch-angel Michael (means Who Is Like God? Or: What’s God Like?) engaged satan and his squad and cast them out.

These things are very difficult and are certainly not easily explained in any common terms. (What may help is to imagine heavenly causality to rest upon space-time causality the way a cube sits on a flat square that forms one of its sides.)

Finally we note that satan has a much larger and romantic and defined role in general culture than in the Bible, and we stress again that the Bible certainly does not support the dualistic idea that the realm of darkness eternally battles the realm of light. Satan is not God’s counter-pole.

The name satan appears in two forms in the Greek New Testament: once as Σαταν (Satan; 2 Corinthians 12:7) and thirty-four times as Σατανας (Satanas; Matthew 4:10, Mark 1:13, Revelation 20:7).

Etymology of the name satan

 

The name satan, שטן (satan) is identical to the noun שטן (satan) meaning adversary:

Abarim Publications’ online Biblical Hebrew Dictionary

 
שטן

None of the sources explains the assumed root שטן (stn). In the Bible the following derivations occur:

  • The masculine noun שטן (satan), meaning adversary. This noun occurs about three dozen times in the Bible and only a few of these occurrences denote the big bad guy: 1 Kings 11:14, “And YHWHraised up שטן (satan) to SolomonHadad the Edomite . . . ” 1 Kings 11:23, “And Elohim raised upשטן (satan) to him; Rezon son of Eliada . . . “In Numbers we even see this noun ascribed to the Angel of YHWH: Numbers 22:22, ” . . . and the Angel of YHWH set Himself in the road as שטן (satan) . . . ” And verse 32, “I have come as שטן(satan) because your way is contrary to Me”.In the New Testament Jesus rebukes Peter by saying, “Go behind me satan, . . . ” (Matthew 16:23), illustrating the difficulty that translators run into when the same word is translated sometimes as a regular verb or noun and sometimes as a defining personal name. Every now and then Jesus’ words are transliterated from Aramaic and it is highly unlikely that He personified Peter with the devil.
  • The denominative verb שטן (satan) meaning to resist or be an adversary. This verb is used six times in the Bible, for instance in Psalm 38:20, where it reads: ‘ . . . they שטן (satan) me because good follows me.’
  • The feminine noun שטנה (sitna), denoting a kind of written accusation, or a Cease And Desist notice. This noun is used only once in the Bible, in Ezra 4:6.

None of the sources used make mention of a linguistic connection to the following words, but the letternun is often placed after a root to create a phrase that isolates or personifies the conceptual action of the root. Whether this actually happened with the word שטן (satan) may be less important than any audience’s supposition:

The verb שוט (sut) means swerve or fall away, as used in Psalm 40:4 (NAS: lapse; NIV: turn aside). Derivation שט (set) means swerver, revolter as used in Hosea 5:2.

The verb שטה (sata) means turn aside, turn, decline, and always from a good way into a bad one. HAW Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament notes that the Aramaic cognate of this verb means to stray, and the Ethiopic one to be seduced.

In medieval times, our root began to be spelled with the letter שׂ (sin), as opposed to the letter שׁ (shin), thus forming the word שׂטן (satan). The letter ט (teth) is one of two t-sounds of the Hebrew alphabet, the other one being ת (taw). A verb that probably sounded quite similar to our word שׂטן (satan), meaning adversary, is שׁתן (shatan), meaning to urinate (1 Samuel 25:22, 1 Kings 14:10).


Associated Biblical names

satan meaning

 

For a meaning of the name satan, NOBSE Study Bible Name List reads Adversary. Jones’ Dictionary of Old Testament Proper Names does not translate.

 

The name Beelzebub in the Bible

 

Beelzebul is the English transliteration of the Greek word for Baal Zebub, and Beelzebub is a bit of a hybrid of the two. Beelzebub, or Beelzebul, is the New Testament name for satan, a.k.a the devil (Matthew 10:25).

Etymology of the name Beelzebub

 

The Greek name Beelzebub consists of two elements. Firstly the common Hebrew word Baal, meaning owner, husband:

Abarim Publications’ online Biblical Hebrew Dictionary

 
בעל

The verb בעל (ba’al) means to exercise dominion over, or to be lord over. One group of usages deals with a man “marrying” a woman, and it should be noted that men marry women by means of the verbבעל (ba’al) but not the other way around (Genesis 20:3, Isaiah 54:1). The other, smaller, group of usages deals with owning or ruling something (Isaiah 26:13).

The derivatives of this verb are:

  • The ubiquitous masculine noun בעל (ba’al) meaning owner (Exodus 21:28, Isaiah 1:3), husband (Genesis 20:3, Hosea 2:18), citizen (of Jericho: Joshua 24:11; of Arnon: Numbers 21:28; ofShechem: Judges 9:2), ruler (Isaiah 16:8). The noun בעל (ba’al) is also used in a kind of proverbial sense, in playful constructions that emphasizes a certain characteristic of someone: בעל אף (ba’al ap), literally meaning lord of the snort: someone who easily gets angry (Proverbs 22:24), orבעל החכמה (ba’al hahochma), lord of the wisdoms (Ecclesiastes 7:12).
  • The feminine noun בעלה (ba’ala), pretty much the female equivalent of the masculine counterpart, except that it can never mean wife. It’s used once in the sense of lady-boss (1 Kings 17:17), and twice in constructions: בעלה אוב (ba’ala ob), “mistress of the ghost” or necromancer (1 Samuel 28:7), and בעלה כשפים (ba’ala keshepim), mistress of the witchcrafts (Nahum 3:4).

Read more Comments Off on The name satan in the Bible The qualities and character of the creature known as satan are almost all debatable

Kaine-compressedConfusion has ensued after Hillary Clinton’s running mate Tim Kaine told reporters on Friday that he supports the Hyde Amendment just days after spokespersons said that Kaine stood behind Clinton’s goal to repeal it.

As previously reported, a spokesperson for Clinton stated this week that Kaine, a Roman Catholic who personally opposes abortion but believes women should have the “right to choose,” advised that he would support the repeal of the Hyde Amendment.

“He has said that he will stand with Secretary Clinton to defend a woman’s right to choose, to repeal the Hyde Amendment,” the unnamed spokesperson stated.

Read more Comments Off on Kaine Willing to Support Clinton on Public Abortion Funding Although Personally Opposed
X
wpChatIcon
X
DW Popup Card
en_USEnglish
CREATE A FREE WEBSITE FOR YOUR CHURCH OR MINISTRY - YOUR SOUL IS WORTH MORE THAN THE WHOLE WORLD What Does It profit a Man IF he Gains the whole World and loses his Soul ?
Hello. Add your message here.